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Book Review| I Take You – Eliza Kennedy

22237470I Take You Eliza Kennedy
Published: May 5th 2015 by Crown
Genres: Women’s Fiction, Chick Lit, Humor
Pages: 320
Goodreads Rating: 3.00
My Rating: 4.00

Meet Lily Wilder: New Yorker, lawyer extraordinaire, blushing bride. And totally incapable of being faithful to one man.
Lily’s fiancé Will is a brilliant, handsome archaeologist. Lily is sassy, impulsive, fond of a good drink (or five) and has no business getting married. Lily likes Will, but does she love him? Will loves Lily, but does he know her? As the wedding approaches, Lily’s nights—and mornings, and afternoons—of booze, laughter and questionable decisions become a growing reminder that the happiest day of her life might turn out to be her worst mistake yet.

I received this book from Blogging from Books in exchange for an honest review.

I don’t even know how I picked this book out. It isn’t extremely popular on the Twittersphere or Tumblr, so I don’t think it was on my TBR shelf. It wasn’t even a book I would typically read, even though I do like contemporary fiction. The last “non-typical” book I read, that I thought was contemporary fiction, was Stephanie Evanovich’s Big Girl Panties, which I hated. The beginning of BGP had such promise, but the ending was awful. To say I was hesitant about this would be an understatement. I should not have been worried, because I loved it.

Spoilers will be in this review. Read more at your own risk. Spoilers will be following this sentence. You have been warned.

In the beginning of the book, I was not a big fan of Lily’s. She is completely unfaithful to her fiance, Will, and can be extremely unapologetic about it. I am all for sexually active women, but once you add another person’s feelings into the mix, that’s when I start to have an issue. Will is described as perfect multiple times. He has three PhDs, he is smitten with Lily, and he’s all the good keywords: sweet, dorky, kind, et cetera. When our main character is cheating on him and leading him towards inevitable pain, I’m not excited about her. She’s hilarious and intelligent and a complete feminist, but that does not make her a good person. The good news is she knows she’s an asshole and wants to change. I loved Lily by the end of this. Her thoughts on everything, from marriage to her own life, is that of somebody is deep denial. She ignores her past because she doesn’t think it can affect the future, but that is exactly what happens. Lily can be fierce and emotional, strong and weak, lovable and detestable all at once, and it is so great to read about a character that I’m not even sure I like half the time.

Her best friend, Winifred “Freddy”, is one of few women supporting characters who isn’t written as catty or overly supportive. Is she extremely supportive? Yes, but she doesn’t kiss Lily’s ass the way others might. When Lily wants to drink all day, Freddy is there to keep up. When Lily decides she’s had enough to drink and thinks, “Hey, let’s do some lines of coke in the hotel bathroom!”, who’s there with some cocaine? Good ol’ Freddy! She is the epitome of a best friend, who will be there whenever you need her, who won’t steer you wrong but will let you find your own way.

 Lily’s four mother-figures (one biological, two step-mothers and one grandmother) provide an interesting look at parenting.  All three wives are divorced from Lily’s father, so they have all felt the pain that comes with a failed relationship. They all love differently, and they are all convinced that Lily has no right to marry anyone. I don’t know why Kennedy decided to add two extra motherly figures, unless to show just how screwed up marriage can really be.

I didn’t really fall into the story until halfway through it. There were some characters I just didn’t trust, and I wanted to know what big secret made Lily leave Florida. Finding out about the dynamite, Teddy and Lee made me softer towards Lily, but not too much. While I still felt like she shouldn’t be sleeping around if she was trying to marry somebody, I didn’t trust Will at this point. He seemed too good to be true, one of Lily’s bridesmaids was disappearing all the time and, at this point, Lily had slept with Will’s boss. There was no way Will wasn’t going to find out about her infidelities; it was just a matter of when.

The feminism in I Take You was absolutely fucking great. First, Lily is a lawyer. Not a paralegal or a receptionist; no, her job is lawyer. Second, she likes having sex. She has no apologies for this, nor should she need one (though, to be fair, I feel like an apology should have been made had Will not been doing the exact same fucking thing but whatever). Freddy and Lily hate the word “slut”, calling it “the S-word,” and even dislike the use of the word “cunt.”The two talk often of double standards, which is a huge theme in this book.

When Lily finds out that Will has been cheating on her the same way she’s been cheating on him, she loses it. She calls him a whore and has a miniature rage-fest, where she is filled with jealousy. At one point, a few hours after the revelation, Will makes a comment like, “Why was it okay when I wasn’t enough for you, but not when you weren’t enough for me?” Similar sentences like this are thrown at Lily, who tries so hard to make excuses for her own behavior. She can’t, of course, and comes to face that.

I Take You always has great little speeches about sex, how humans feel about sex, how we’re conditioned to think about sex and if monogamy is even really meant for us. It actually had me thinking about whether monogamy really was the best thing for people. Personally, I think it’s subjective. Some people can’t deal with the thought of being with one person for the rest of their lives, and some can’t bear to be parted with their significant others. I don’t think we are biologically conditioned one way or the other. I also don’t agree with Lily’s mothers when they said that infidelity is inevitable in marriages. Maybe I’m a romantic, and maybe I’m naive. I like to hope that, as a faithful spouse, my spouse will return the favor and be faithful back. If not, we’ll have to break his dick off. Sorry, but don’t say I didn’t warn ya!

I definitely give this book four wormies and suggest it to any self-proclaimed feminist or feminist-supporters. Read on, ladies!

four star

Have you read I Take You? Do you plan on reading it? Let me know in the comments!

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