Vacation to Block Island, Rhode Island

Now that we live six hours away from our family in Maryland, my parents have been making monthly trips to see us. This past week was my mom’s birthday, so they had booked a hotel on Block Island. I had never heard of this place, and was expecting it to be some giant nursing home with nothing to do. I could not have been more wrong.

From the Block Island Website: Block Island, nestled in the Atlantic 12 miles from coastal Rhode Island, offers the vacationer what does not seem possible anymore – simple relaxation in a startling beautiful place.  The Island is famous for its miles of free public beaches, sparkling clear waters, dramatic bluffs, preserved open spaces, and fun-filled activities for visitors of all ages.

You have to take a ferry to reach the island and, since we were bringing a car, the ferry ride took about an hour. The sky had been overcast and grey, and where I live, the temperature kept hitting a humid 86 degrees F. Considering our hotel had no A/C, I was less than thrilled to go. I could see it now: The three of us sweating and miserable, splayed on our beds in the hotel just waiting for this nightmare to be over. Even when we made it to the island, we were sprinkled with some rain, which only made me more nervous. I’ll admit: The first day wasn’t the best. It was hot, and I was sweating every time I breathed. I was tired and exhausted and didn’t feel better until the sun started going down. Once it cooled off (and I had two drinks in me), the night got better. My dad and I ended up going to the Ice Cream Place (yes, that’s what it’s called) and oh my gosh. I got a peanut butter brownie while he got two scoops of ice cream with hot fudge, caramel and whipped cream. That brownie was delicious beyond words. In fact, we went back the next night and I got the same thing. After dessert, we were all pretty tuckered out and went to bed.

The next day we decided to go on a hike, and that is when we found the Mohegan Bluffs. There are these long stairs you have to walk down, then walk down a slightly scary rock cliff (I had knee surgery; if I can do it, you can do it) and then you’re there! Below is a picture of the stairs.bi1

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As you can see, the view is beyond words. The water was freezing in the morning, but warmed up in the three hours we were there. The wind kept us cool so we weren’t dying in our skins. There were maybe ten people on the beach when we got there, and stayed like that until we left. If you stay near the stairs, it becomes crowded with all the people. If you decide to walk the beach a little and go through this trail of rocks, you will come to the part of the beach where there is almost nobody. There were no bugs either. No crazy flies or spiders or bees to flick off. I did have to brush an ant off me once in the full two-days we were there, but I can live with that.

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The water is so clear, too. That was what surprised me the most. When you live in the ‘States, you know our water is usually brown or some other disgusting color it shouldn’t be. The pictures speak for themselves. It felt like we were in the Caribbean but with cooler weather and more English-speakers. I never wanted to leave that beach. Every so often, we would come across these little rock creations people would make where they balanced one on top of another. One was over six feet tall! I made a tiny one, and I’m excited to see if it’ll still be there when I visit again.

After the bluffs, we decided to check out the lighthouse a few miles down the street. By now we were killing time until our ferry left, and decided that sitting by the lighthouse would be a good idea. The tours had stopped at 4PM, about an hour after we got there, so we sat in the shade and read for a bit. I took some pictures there too.

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It turns out the place where the lighthouse currently sits is not where it always sat. It had to be pushed back because it was too close to the cliffs. Though there is a fence around the property to keep people from trekking down the cliffs, the view alone was beautiful. It reminded me of those pictures from the cliffs in Ireland, though scaled down by a good amount. The wind was just strong enough to make me want a long flowing dress, with matching flowing hair. It reminded me of a scene from a historical romance novel. It would be the perfect place for a big, gorgeous house to sit, so you could stare out at the water all day.

Then it was time to leave. Below is a picture from the ferry as we said goodbye to Block Island. The ferry ride back to Narragansett was chillier than expected, but we did get to see some dolphins! Unfortunately, I wasn’t quick enough with my camera and didn’t get a picture. I barely had time to get my glasses on before they disappeared!

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If you plan on going to Block Island, I’d recommend staying at the National Hotel. The shrimp and lobster spring rolls there are to die for. I wish I could eat them every day because holy damn they were good. Our room faced the ocean, so it was warmer than the rooms that faced the island, but every morning we were able to see the sunrise. I have never felt more in awe of our life on this earth than when I watched the sun come up from the ocean. It was beyond words.

You don’t have to take anything other than luggage either. You’re able to rent almost anything you’d need: bikes, mopeds, or cars. If walking is your forte, you can walk almost anywhere. It might take a little longer and, depending on the weather, hurt a bit, but as long as the wind keeps up I don’t think it’d be that bad.

I cannot wait to go back there, and if you’re close to the CT/NY/MA area, I’d suggest visiting.

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